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Developments and progress at 1 year old – baby’s 1st birthday

Typical baby development at 12 months old - psychological, physical, social. We are one year old, happy birthday baby!

Happy Birthday Baby! You’re now one. Time has gone so quickly!

 

So what has he been up to?
In the week or so before his first birthday he’s
  • Spoken his first word, taken his first steps (although the steps have not been repeated since then, grrr)
  • Appears to understand more words and basic instruction, e.g. can you put this in the box (or maybe it’s just fluke each time). Can say “up”, kind of say “moo”, knows the cow says moo, knows the chicken says “bukkarr” and can say his version of a chicken sound, might have said “book” but i’m not 100% sure, say dada, has said “hi” a few times.
  • We have two new teeth coming through – he has 8 already so this will make 10.
  • He can nod his head, wave hello and bye bye and wave this if you ask him to say bye/hello
  • He can play ball by rolling it to me (though not completely accurately)
  • His concentration during reading has improved and he can sit most of the way through a baby book.
  • He eats a lot of finger food and cut up “regular” food, such as pasta, sandwhiches, cheese, basically meals and food that I feel to the toddler (nearly 2.75 years old) but with extra attention to salt content. However, saying that, now that he is one he could have a little more salt in his diet. The NHS write:
The maximum recommended amount of salt for babies and children is:
  • up to 12 months – less than 1g of salt a day (less than 0.4g sodium)
  • 1 to 3 years – 2g of salt a day (0.8g sodium)

What are general developments and milestones at 12 months?

You can find a useful birth to five development timeline here, from the NHS. According to this timeline:
  • 10-18 months, baby usually walks alone
  • by 12 months, responds to their own name
  • 12-18 months, takes an interest in words

 

There is also useful information on development across a range of areas here from the CDC, including social/emotional, language/communication, cognitive and physical developments:
  • Plays games such as peek a boo, can hand you a book if they want a story, repeats sounds to get attention
  • responds to simple verbal requests and follow simple directions e.g. pick up the (item)
  • can bang two things together
  • moves into a sitting position without assistance, cruises/pulls to stand, may take a few steps, may stand alone

 

For further reading on development in young children, have a look at this article “Children under three years: the time of their lives” (M. Dowling), a free resource from the British Association for Early Childhood Education (more resources found here). It discusses areas of progress, important social and attachment related elements, cognitive and emotional development and more.

 

Psychology Resources & Links – Parenting, Child, Mental health & Wellbeing

Psychology related worksheets, resources, psychoeducation – and links to other sites that provide valuable resources along these lines including self help resources and information.

 

Links to external resources:

Psychology Tools(http://psychology.tools/)

  • Provides free resources for therapists, including worksheets to download, psychological models, translated resources, and welcomes resource contributions from everyone. Psychology Tools was set up by a clinical psychologist in 2008 “as a way to develop and share materials useful to psychological therapists”. I have made use of this website for several years.

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Get Self Help – (http://www.getselfhelp.co.uk/)

  • “Self Help & Therapist Resources”. A good resource for psychological education sheets, worksheets, therapy and self help related materials. Provides information for self help, therapists, trainees, mental health professionals. I have been using this site for helpful worksheets and inspiration for, hmm probably about 5 years!

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NHS self help leaflets

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Centre for Clinical Interventions

  • Has a number of resources for mental health practitioners including therapist manuals, brief information sheets and worksheets covering a range of topics including depression, bipolar disorder, social anxiety, unhelpful thinking styles, self-esteem, eating disorders, generalized anxiety and mindfulness, panic, sleep, procrastination, pperfectionism
  • Sheets include resources such as thought diaries, goals records, core beliefs worksheets, to name a few
  • There are also downloadable packs for “consumers
  • Downloads are well and neatly presented, illustrated, and contain many examples to explain and illustrate the points they present
  • Please read their full disclaimer if you are interested, for example they write that the information provided in the information packages is intended for information purposes only…. “information packages are not meant to treat depression, social anxiety, bipolar disorder or any other mental illness….the information on this website is NOT a substitute for proper diagnosis, treatment or the provision of advice by an appropriate health professional…”[more]

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Mind – for better mental health – charity – information and support

  • Information on types of mental health problems, treatments, helping others, legal rights, tips for everyday living guides to support and services, and helplines
  • Helpful resource on A-Z mental health

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The Compassionate Mind Foundation

  • Set up in 2006 the Foundation aims to promote wellbeing through the scientific understanding and application of compassion”

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The British Psychological Society – Careers Resources

  • Information about careers, education and training in psychology from the BPS

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General Links

Links to a range of pregnancy/parenting/baby/child related information

(I am not affiliated with any of these sites / resources; they are just some options that I’ve come across that you might find relevant)

 

General pregnancy and baby guides

  • A general pregnancy and baby guide from the NHS website –  I looked up many issues and queries during my pregnancy and first few months of LL’s life here.  Pages include short videos on many topics.
  • Pregnancy related questions – From the NHS website. covers issues including food and drink during pregnancy, pre-conception, travel during pregnancy, labour, and more.

 

Information for parents

  • The Start 4 Life website – There is a range of information on the Start 4 Life website including on breastfeeding, introducing solids, and sections relevant to Mums, Dads, Babies and Professionals. You can also sign up for weekly emails

 

Feeding

 

Motor skills and Physical Development

  • Tummy Time Tips – information on what tummy time is, why do it, tips and a helpful video outlining these points. The site says it is “Solely committed to providing the most up-to-date information about the importance of tummy time”, written by a paediatric occupational therapist.

 

General activities, play and learning ideas/tips

There are so many sites and resources out there that detail creative and helpful play and activity ideas. These are just a few that i’ve come across and have probably pinned ideas to the Baby Brain Pinterest board. I have no personal or professional connection to any of the boards or authors, I just liked some of their activities and ideas.

  • The Imagination Tree – a wide range of creative play and learning activities for babies, toddlers, preschoolers and school age
  • Where imagination grows – range of art, craft, toddler and preschoolers activities including playing with light
  • Laughing kids learn – range of sensory play, art&craft, numeracy, science and recipe examples including a zipper board, busy bags, tugging box, with lovely bright and easy to follow pictures
  • Adventures at home with mum – a variety of play and DIY activity ideas including sensory boxes and home made toys, with pictures to illustrate the idea and how baby responds, and nice clear lists of “baby learning concepts” included for the activity such as helps with fine motor skills, developing hand eye coordination, etc.
  • No Time for Flash Cards – site that covers a range of early education and creative play ideas, activities and crafts for kids, including sensory activities, fine and gross motor skills, pretend play, books and reading. You can also helpfully search for activities by age, from infant to school age

Disclaimer: baby-brain.co.uk can not take responsibility for any of the content or advice supplied on any linked to external websites. Baby-brain.co.uk is not affiliated with any of these sites and only links to them as a references source that you may chose to look at for further information if you deem necessary. Baby-brain.co.uk accepts no liability for any consequences arising from the use of any resources made available on this website. Materials referred to and supplied here are intended to be read as interest pieces only, and not as direct advice or in place of guidance and advice from a qualified health care professional who you have consulted with. If you have any questions / concerns / issues regarding your child’s development / well-being, or yours or anyone’s mental health and well-being, please contact your GP, Health Visitor, Paediatrician, Midwife, or other relevant health care professional. Adult supervision is required for any activity featured on this blog. Please decide based on each individual activity if it is appropriate for you and your own child.

Happy new year 2016!

Another year has come and gone…wishing everyone :

 

Happy New Year from Baby-Brain.co.uk and thank you

Thank you again for all the visits, reading and support. This year we welcomed our new addition to the family. Looking forward to the year to come.

Happy Halloween 2015!

Yep, it’s Halloween. Not sure if you’re supposed to wish others a “happy” one, but may it be filled with chocolate and fun, or not, if that’s what you prefer! Personally, I’ve forgotten to buy any sweets or treats so hoping no one comes knocking tonight (otherwise they’ll be presented with an old orange or even an old mince pie, if they’re lucky. I’ve got a few of those knocking around)!
Suppose I had better get prepared for the years to come; lots of trick or treating ahead for the *children*!

 

Happy Halloween 2015 from Baby-Brain.co.uk. Babies, Psychology, Motherhood

Little Lovely was amazed by the size of this pumpkin we saw outside a shop

Baby & toddler sensory play & activity ideas

Here are some baby & toddler sensory play and activity ideas:

Baby painting with one step & ingredient. Safe and edible and sensory play fun! From baby-brain.co.uk

Baby paint in one step

gentle water sensory shower, bath time sensory activity play for baby. baby-brain.co.uk. psychology resource, perspective, blog on motherhood & babies

Sensory water play

fun & sensory play ideas - great list of sensory activities with baby. baby-brain.co.uk. psychology resource, perspective, blog on motherhood & babies

Sensory Activities List

Quick easy baby play & activity ideas: baby-brain.co.uk psychology resource, perspective and blog on motherhood

Really quick and easy play ideas

Water tray play

Quick easy baby play & activities: Cardboard tube play ideas. baby-brain.co.uk psychology resource, perspective and blog on motherhood

Cardboard tube play ideas: tactile and visual craft idea

Welcome to the new arrival – a new baby

 

The new baby has arrived! Here’s a few pictures from the first few days. I’ll attempt to update on a few newborn issues.

New arrival - our new baby - newborn issues, labour, birth. Baby-Brain.co.uk

New Baby

Things feel more relaxed the second time around. They kind of have to be because we also have a 21 month old to look after at the same time. I’m still to work out how I’m going to be doing toddler and newborn care at the same time once I’m on my own every day with it. However, it is still very early days.

 

My brain seems to think the new baby is somehow the first one, but smaller and younger and I was getting slightly confused with names for the first 2 days!

 

I forgot how painful labour can be (durrrhh). I think “mummy amnesia” is actually supposed to be a real “thing”. I also forgot about all the after-issues, aches and pains; It seems like at first you’re fine, then your body realises you just gave birth and can’t be going around putting the washing on and continuing as usual.

 

New arrival - our new baby - newborn issues, labour, birth. Baby-Brain.co.uk

Brotherly Love

The first child (LL) seems to be coping very well with the new addition and is not phased. We bought him a new toy and said it was from the baby. He liked the toy. He likes to kiss the baby and takes great interest in him and all his possessions like “baby’s blanket”, “baby’s basket”, and has liked to sit in the Moses basket and baby car seat himself. Hopefully this brotherly love will continue!

 

Now: a time for adjustment and enjoying.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 parenting “fails” I feel slightly socially judged and guilty about – but also don’t really care!

3 parenting "fails" I feel only slightly guilty about!

3 parenting “fails” I feel slightly socially judged and guilty about – but also don’t really care!

OK, so there are some things I do that I feel a bit guilty about. I’m waiting for the cognitive dissonance to kick in. I don’t even know if “others” do judge it, or if it’s just in my mind about what’s “bad”. Wonder where I got these views from? Anyway, here’s some things I do that I wonder about (but don’t really think it’s a “fail” – I just wrote that for attention)

 

 1. Watching television

My child is 18 months old. He was never interested in television in the past but has been able to watch it in the last few months. I can’t remember exactly when this started but when I realised he could be mesmerized by the television and distracted for a few moments it was brilliant (I won’t lie, after giving all my waking time to another, small, person for the previous 12-15 months, this was good). He likes a few programmes such as The Clangers, and In The Night Garden. We don’t watch television that much. Sometimes, it’s at 6am, which is when he likes to wake up, and I’m not awake at all. It’s usually in the evening just after bath and before bed to relax him and so that I can get things ready for bed. It’s sometimes after we’ve been out all day and I need to sit down for a bit and he’ll be occupied.
Interactive television watching is probably better – if I want to feel less guilty I attempt to have a conversation around the programme, asking questions such as what colour is that, or what do you think is going to happen, etc. But also, just sitting together and spending time watching and modelling emotions and expressions can’t be a bad thing, right?

 

Things I do as a parent I feel guilty about - Placating with food

Have a snack, darling

2. Giving food to placate or stave off further tantrums/crying/grumpiness

So we’re on the busy bus, hot, cold, whatever, busy, screaming, child trying to get out of his buggy straps ALL the time (a recent thing), or he’s tired but refuses to go to sleep. Have a biscuit. Peace for a few moments. I stop feeling the annoyance of all the other bus passengers.

 

 

3. Eating in McDonald’s?

Things I do as a parent I feel guilty about - Going to Mcdonalds

Fun times at McDonalds

This is a new thing. I realised they give you balloons, they have free crayons and paper, good highchairs (on wheels!) and sometimes offer to carry my tray while I push the pram to the table. Plus, I like chips (fries) and milkshakes. Don’t worry… he only has a few chips (*gasp*) and then I give him separate food like fruit, a child friendly sandwich etc. And they don’t seem to mind me bringing him in his own food. We also explored the feel and coldness of ice from my drink last time we were there (picture).

 

So… not really fails, but I don’t feel 100% comfortable with them. But sometimes, they are convenient, and this is probably normal.

CBT and promoting mental health in young people

CBT and promoting mental health in young people. Links to resources. Baby-brain.co.uk

I came across this website today:

http://www.juvenilementalhealthmatters.com/Welcome.html

 

I’m not affiliated with it or anything. I just thought it looked interesting. They claim their aim is to:

“Conduct high quality scientific research and develop high quality intervention programmes that promote mental health in all young people. We make all of our resources available free of charge” 

 

There are some free CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) workbooks and sheets that you can read about here

→ Access the workbooks here

 

Please use your discretion and common sense when using self help therapeutic resources and things such as this that are available freely online. If you are concerned about any issues you or your child may be experiencing then you might wish to consider a visit and chat with your GP, midwife, healthvisitor or any other relvant health care professional who will be able to advise further.

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