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Learning to self feed and our new sucky bowl

So today I bought my Little Lovely (just over 12 months old) one of those bowls that suck down onto the table so that the baby can’t pick it up and throw it about.

 

I’d been meaning to buy one for a while because he’s been able to accurately direct the spoon to his mouth if you give him a spoonfull of food in his hand, but we didn’t have any plastic bowls for him to use.

 

Here’s some pictures of how it went. Initially, it went well. He picked up the spoon and had a few half spoonfuls of yoghurt.

Baby self feeding using spoon and sucky bowl. baby-brain.co.uk

 

Then, he decided to eat the yoghurt using his hand because maybe it was quicker. It soon got more messy but it’s a start!

Baby self feeding using spoon and sucky bowl. baby-brain.co.uk

Practising that pincer grasp and fine motor skill development – with raisins!

developing pincer grasp and fine motor skills by grasping raisins, for baby.

Fine motor skill and pincer grasp practice for baby – with raisins

So we were eating snacks today, and LL (aged just over 10 months) always wants to eat what you’re eating if you eat in front of him. I was eating jaffa cakes and so decided he probably shouldn’t have these because they are covered in chocolate and quite sugary.

I gave him some nice organic raisins instead (still have sugar in them, I suppose, but natural sugars?). I put them in a plastic tub for him to fish out and practice his fine motor skills. This was probably a good activity to help him practice his “pincer grasp” as well. Here’s some pictures. He seemed to like the raisins

 

developing pincer grasp and fine motor skills by grasping raisins, for baby.

Baby enjoying his raisins, pincer grasp and fine motor skill development

 

 

 

 

food glorious food

baby-brain.co.uk psychology resource, perspective, blog on babies and motherhood. weaning tales, baby food, highchair

Baby at the table

So the Little Lovely (LL) has been trying out solids for about 2.5 months now. He is regularly eating a meal or two a day, more like two meals actually. I was unsure of how much milk to give him on top of this and whether to drop a milk feed and replace it fully with a solid meal. He seems to have a very good appetite and, other than making some faces at the first few bites of new food, he seems to eat anything he is offered.

 

The weaning literature seems to say stuff like “don’t worry about portion sizes at the moment – your baby will tell you when they have had enough” – and other things like the start of weaning being more about baby trying out and tasting different foods rather than about giving solid food for nutritional purposes. That’s all well and good, but LL will eat A LOT of anything he is offered and usually stops only once the food has run out. So, for example, if I offer him a 120g pouch of food he will eat it all, and eat any additional food that I offer afterwards. I can’t find anywhere how much in one meal an 8.5 month old is supposed to have, because it usually says the usual about “your baby will tell you when he’s full….etc”. Well, ok so am I supposed to stuff him with food until he’s sick? because that’s what it feels like will happen if I keep feeding him.

baby-brain.co.uk weaning tales psychology perspective & blog on motherhood, babies

More Food Please

 

Anyway, I called up the NCT breastfeeding helpline to speak to someone about whether I should drop a milk feed and just have LL on one morning and one evening feed a day (2 feeds/day total). They were very helpful. They told me that he should have 4 feeds a day and will need approx 600ml of milk (formula or breastmilk), and even when he is one year old will still need a pint of milk a day, although at that point he could have cow’s milk. She said about weaning not being meal replacement but about being complementary to the milk, and over time the percentage of food to milk will change, with him having more food and less milk, but for now he gets his main nutrition from milk. She was speaking from a generic perspective, however, and said things that I don’t really think apply to LL such as about baby not eating that much at the moment etc, and that he needs calcium and the like. I told her that he ate a 90g pot of yoghurt today, so would that give him enough calcium? I asked. She thought it would.

He has also increased in weight from the 50% percentile at birth and the first 2 months or so, up to I think above the 90th centile, although I haven’t had him weighed for a few weeks. So, I’m still not sure about portion sizes and want to ensure he isn’t eating too much seeing as he needs 4 milk feeds on top of it!

Anyway, for dinner today he had butternut squash and pear. He seemed to like it. lots left over for the freezer.

baby-brain.co.uk psychology resource & perspective on motherhood and babies, and blog. weaning tales. baby food

Butternut squash and pear home-made baby food

What’s for dinner, baby?

Weaning Tales, Food Ideas. baby-brain.co.uk: Psychology resource and perspective on babies and motherhood

what’s for dinner, baby? Toasty dinner

yum yum – organic brown toast with organic butter cut into baby clutch size pieces, and leftovers from an organic baby food pouch of peaches, pear and baby rice that we had earlier today for lunch! I’m still in the “i’m only getting organic and good stuff” phase. But I don’t think it will last long – in a similar vein I planned to eat mainly organic and healthy fruit and vegetables during pregnancy, but that didn’t last long either! I was soon on the chips. I cut out diet fizzy drinks though. I think I read a paper about large consumptions of diet drinks and an association with early labour. I will have to find the study and I think it was associated with quite a large quantity of drink though.

I’ve also finally ordered a high chair, so the Little Lovely can eat his food and we can continue weaning without having to use his bouncy chair. I do like the look of Montessori weaning tables, however, but i’m not sure where to buy one and I don’t know if LL can/would be willing to sit in one yet. More on the Montessori method and weaning here (How we Montessori), including pictures of weaning tables (apparently people make their own, if they can’t find one commercially), and here (At Home with Montessori). Here’s a nice little video of a baby sitting at a weaning table eating and some of the Montessori related thinking and process relating to eating and weaning, from the Full Montessori (good name!). Ceramic or glass bowls/kitchenware is also used in the Montessori method because if it falls and breaks, then baby witnesses and learns the consequence. A trip to the charity shop is in order maybe for some cheap and cheerful bowls that you don’t mind breaking then?!

Maybe I shouldn’t have ordered that highchair…..

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